Electric shock

Electric Shock An electric shock can occur upon contact of a human or animal body with any source of voltage high enough to cause sufficient current flow through the muscles or nerves. The minimum detectable current in humans is thought to be about 1 mA. The current may cause tissue damage or heart fibrillation if…

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Landlords

Landlord Legal Requirements Anyone who lets residential accommodation (such as houses, flats and bedsits, holiday homes, caravans and boats) as a business activity is required by law to ensure the equipment they supply as part of the tenancy is safe. The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 1994 requires that all mains electrical equipment (cookers, washing machines,…

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Electrical safety tips

Protect Your Family with Electrical Safety Tips According to the National Fire Protection Association, electrical cords and temporary wiring account for over 25% of the estimated 81,000 electrical system fires that occur each year. These fires can be prevented by following these essential home electrical safety tips. Extension cord safety Don’t use extension cords as…

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Electrical safety in the home 1

Electrical safety involving outlets, plugs and extension cords is one of the most important home safety issues. U.K. fire departments respond to an average of 47,820 structure fires a year involving an electrical fire or malfunction1, but there are steps that homeowners and tenants can take to help prevent electrical fires. From tamper-resistant receptacles to…

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Which is safer a.c or d.c ?

Alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) have slightly different effects on the human body, but both are dangerous above a certain voltage. The risk of injury changes according to the frequency of the AC, and it is common for DC to have an AC component (called ripple). Someone with special equipment can measure this,…

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